18: CRAFT (Outstanding Copywriting (print))

Naharouki - An-Nahar Newspaper - An-Nahar Newspaper JPG
Naharouki - An-Nahar Newspaper - An-Nahar Newspaper JPG
Naharouki - An-Nahar Newspaper - An-Nahar Newspaper JPG
Naharouki - An-Nahar Newspaper - An-Nahar Newspaper JPG

Naharouki - An-Nahar Newspaper
An-Nahar Newspaper

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Naharouki - An-Nahar Newspaper - An-Nahar Newspaper

Shortlist

Title of Entry: Naharouki
Brand: An-Nahar Newspaper
Product/Service: An-Nahar Newspaper
Client: An Nahar Newspaper
Entrant Company: Impact BBDO
Creative Agency: Impact BBDO Dubai
Craft Leader(s): Marie Claire Maalouf
Creative Director: Marie-Claire Maalouf
Art Director: Yasmina Boustani
Copywriter: Rohan Kodialbail
Chief Creative Officer: Paul Shearer
Sector: 38273
Account Executive: Emile Tabanji
Date of Release: 2020-02-12
Photographer: Anwar Amro, Hussein Malla, Joseph Eid
Notes: When the Lebanese government failed to find solutions to the looming economic crisis, stagnant economy and unemployment, the country was plunged into the 6th revolution in its history. However, in a country where women don’t have equal rights and face massive underrepresentation in the government, women for the very first first time, took the lead and turned it into the first ever peaceful revolution. This show of strength helped ensure a whopping 400% increase in female representation in the new cabinet. However, while this bold act of defiance and leadership was lauded by most of Lebanon, there were many who trivialized their actions, and criticized women for speaking up, staying out on the streets late into the night, and more. An-Nahar, Lebanon’s leading newspaper, a staunch proponent of women's rights, wanted to show its support for these woman and inject new life into the movement. Women faced innumerable injustices in Lebanon, whether legally or illegally- ranging from one of the worlds largest pay gaps to the inability to pass down their nationality to their children. While known to be outspoken and thought leaders, women don’t have equal rights and face massive underrepresentation in the government. When Lebanon was plunged into the 6th revolution in its history, women who feared that the protests would turn violent, led the movement and turned it into Lebanon's first ever peaceful revolution. This resulted in a 400% increase in female representation in the new cabinet. However this also had another effect. While most of Lebanon lauded the effort, the patriarchy condemned it and criticized women heavily for their actions. Their good deeds and efforts were trivialized and their actions were mocked in stereotypical fashion. We found countless posts on social media sites that reflected the patriarchal mindset entrenched in Lebanese culture, such as “Women shouldn’t stay out late”, “Women talk too much” and “Women should know their place”. We took these sexist statements and turned them into a plucky and powerful print and outdoor campaign by juxtaposing them with raw, real photos of women leading the revolution. The messaging went on to turn the stereotypical criticisms made by men, into positive, and inspiring pieces of communication. Each ad ended with a reminder - that the movement led by women had ensured a 400% increase in women's representation in the cabinet. We released 3 pieces of communication that addressed 3 stereotypical criticisms of women found online - "Woman talk too much", "Girls should not stay out late" and "Women should know their place". We took these sexist statements and turned them into a plucky and powerful print and outdoor campaign by juxtaposing them with raw, real photos of women leading the revolution, taken by some of Lebanon's leading photographers. The communication was released under the ‘Naharouki’ banner, which means ‘your day’, when read by a woman, and was derived by making a minor tweak in the newspaper’s name ‘An Nahar’. The ‘ads’ were also designed like news articles with controversial headlines, ensuring that they were impossible to miss. The campaign injected a new sense of purpose into the movement. It was also organically used as a means to respond to comments that were critical of women. Women’s groups celebrated it and lavished praise on An-Nahar for standing with women. With the campaign, An-Nahar once again solidified its reputation as a publication that always looks to empower women.
Other Credits: Executive Creative Director: Ali Rez
Other Credits: Regional Creative Director: Joe Abou Khaled
Other Credits: Creative Services Director: Tennyson Torcato
Other Credits: Senior Print Producer: Rebecca Ooi